Arabic world’s role in scientific discovery

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Re:One Resource (Score:5, Interesting)

by MrNaz (730548) * on Tuesday May 05, @11:20AM (#27831331)
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You may be interested to read about the role that the Middle East played in the development of modern science. While they are not very mainstream (hey, history gets written by those on top at any point, which at the moment happens to be Western nations), there are many books that deal with the advanced science that was being carried out in that region. Here are some tidbits to get you started:

Modern optics was pioneered by the discoveries of Ibn Sahl (who discovered Snell’s law 800 years before Snellius renamed it [wikipedia.org]).

In the 9th century, 500 years before Europeans started arguing whether the world was round, Al-Battani and his ilk calculated the circumference of the Earth at 40,253km. Correct to within 200km!

Al-Jabr [wikipedia.org] is the Arab mathematician who discovered (or invented, whichever way you lean on that topic) algebra. It is still named after him.

Good luck with this. Scientific history is fascinating!

(Full disclosure: I am a Muslim, which is why I find this topic so interesting.)

Re:One Resource (Score:5, Informative)

by LotsOfPhil (982823) on Tuesday May 05, @11:33AM (#27831557)

In the 9th century, 500 years before Europeans started arguing whether the world was round, Al-Battani and his ilk calculated the circumference of the Earth at 40,253km. Correct to within 200km!

Eratosthenes calculated the circumference of the Earth 1000 years before that. “Recent scholarship finds that since about the 3rd century BC, virtually no educated person in Western civilization has believed in a flat Earth.” link. [wikipedia.org]

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